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WRANGEL ISLAND & THE BERING STRAIT

A wonderful expedition 'Across the Top of the World'

Russia Birding Tours: our Wrangel Island and Chukotka birding tour is one of our most unusual bird watching and wildlife holidays. There are few places on this planet as remote as Wrangel Island, a chunk of land in the Arctic Ocean to the north of Siberia that is famous for its extraordinary wildlife, including remarkable numbers of Polar Bears that come to feed on the huge number of Walruses that occur here. Musk Ox is another draw, as are Grey and Humpback Whales, Emperor and Snow Geese, Spectacled and King Eiders, Ross's and Sabine's Gulls, Yellow-billed and Pacific Loons, Snowy Owl and even the critically endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper, either here or in eastern Chukotka around the Bering Strait.

Monday 6th July — Monday 20th July 2020
(15 days)


Second departure: Monday 20th July — Monday 3rd August (15 days)

Third departure: Monday 3rd August — Monday 17th August (15 days)

Leader: Heritage Expeditions leaders

Group Size Limit: 15

Tour Category: Easy walking for the most part and comfortable accommodations

Wrangel Island in late summer and autumn hosts one of the highest concentrations of Polar Bears in the Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

Wrangel Island in late summer and autumn hosts one of the highest concentrations of Polar Bears in the Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

This unique expedition crosses the Arctic Circle twice and the 180° meridian four times, comes within a ‘stone’s throw’ of the International Dateline and includes the isolated and pristine Wrangel and Herald Islands and a significant section of the wild Northeastern Siberian coastline of the Chukotka peninsula. It is a journey only made possible in recent years by the thawing in the politics of the region and the retreat of the summer pack ice in the Chukchi Sea. There is only a very small distance between Russia and the United States of America along this border area around the Bering Strait, which was said to be divided by the ‘Ice Curtain’, behind which, then and now, lies one of the last great undiscovered wilderness areas in the world.

Our expedition starts at the town of Anadyr, the capital of the Chukotka Autonomous Region, at the mouth of the Anadyr River. Here, Belugas and Largha Seals gather to feast on the summer salmon run, which is also harvested by the indigenous Chukchi people as well as European Russians.

As we make our way towards the narrow Bering Strait, which separates Russia from the United States of America, we will have the chance to make a number of landings along the wild coastline of Chukotka. We will see huge numbers seabirds, and zodiac cruise into the heart of some spectacular colonies. Attractive Horned and Tufted Puffins are the star attractions here, joined by Crested, Parakeet and endearing Least Auklets, Common and Brünnich’s Guillemots (or Common and Thick-billed Murres), Pigeon Guillemots, Pelagic Cormorants and Glaucous Gulls.

At Yttygran Island we will have the chance to see ‘Whalebone Alley’, where whale ribs were erected to form arches by the indigenous Chukchi and Inuit hunters of centuries past. On the nearby mainland we may well get the chance to visit some former reindeer herders and enjoy a geothermal hot spring dip, in between looking out for the likes of Sandhill Cranes and King Eiders.

At the Bering Strait itself we will hope conditions are calm enough for a landing at Cape Dezhnev, the most northeasterly point on the Asian mainland, a mere 82 kilometers (52 miles) from Cape Prince of Wales in Alaska. Not far beyond, almost at the Arctic Circle, is the remote settlement of Uelen, where Humpback and Grey Whales often gather in numbers, joined by countless Short-=tailed Shearwaters. Here we will have a chance to see something of the interesting local culture of these traditional hunters of marine mammals.

Before we cross the De Long Strait to Wrangel Island, we will visit remote Kolyuchin Island. Here we can explore a fantastic seabird colony where puffins, guillemots and kittiwakes can be seen and photographed at really close range. Kolyuchin also hosts a huge Walrus haul-out which we will visit in order to enjoy some encounters with these strange yet endearing creatures.

At Wrangel Island we will spend up to five days exploring the island under the guidance of local rangers from the nature reserve. Untouched by glaciers during the last ice age, this island is a treasure trove of Arctic biodiversity and is perhaps best known for the multitude of Polar Bears that concentrate here before the sea ice reforms in the autumn. We hope to catch many glimpses of this beautiful animal. Wrangel is also a crucially important and safe denning area for many female Polar Bears.

The island also boasts the world’s largest population of Pacific Walrus and lies near major feeding grounds for the Grey Whales that migrate thousands of kilometres north from their breeding grounds in Baja California. Musk Ox, Reindeer, Arctic Foxes, Snow Geese, Pomarine Jaegers (or Pomarine Skuas) and Snowy Owls can normally be seen. A visit to the massive bird cliffs on nearby Herald Island is also planned.

The ‘mammoth steppe’ vegetation complex, a rich and diverse relic from the Pleistocene epoch nurtures over 400 plant species and never fails to astound visitors with its sublime and colourful beauty. The number and type of endemic plant species, the diversity within plant communities, the presence of relatively recent mammoth tusks and skulls, a range of terrain types and geological formations in the small geographical space are all visible evidence of Wrangel’s rich natural history and its unique evolutionary status within the Arctic.

The human history of Wrangel Island is fascinating in its own right. Highlights include a 3,400 year old Palo Inuit camp in Krassin Bay, the controversy over the discovery and ownership of the island, the amazing story of the survivors of the Karluk, the fortitude of Ada Blackjack the heroine of the island, the Soviet occupation and militarization, and more recently, the establishment of a world class nature reserve.

On our way back to Anadyr we will visit the north coast of Chukotka and in particular Kolyuchin Inlet, a large marine bay almost walled off from the sea by the long spit called Kosa Belyaka. This interesting area is home to Pacific and Yellow-billed Loons (or Pacific and Yellow-billed Divers), the lovely Emperor Goose, and King and Spectacled Eiders. The critically endangered Spoon-billed Sandpiper still nests in the area and sometimes stays into August.

As we pass through the Bering Strait once more we will visit the Diomede Islands, the larger of which is Russian, the smaller American. The islands are divided by the International Dateline as well as the International border, so one island is in today, the other is in yesterday (or, alternatively, today and tomorrow)! Yet more seabirds, seals and cetaceans will enliven our voyage back to Anadyr and the end of our expedition, perhaps including the rare Short-tailed Albatross.

We shall be sailing on the Kapitan Khlebnikov, a ship operated by Heritage Expeditions of New Zealand. This legendary Russian icebreaker and former research vessel holds the passenger ship record for the most crossings of the Northwest Passage and has famously circumnavigated Antarctica twice. Built in 1981 by Finland's Wärtsilä Company and one of four Kapitan Sorokin-class icebreakers, Kapitan Khlebnikov wraps comfortable surrounds in a formidable, ice-reinforced vessel powered by 24,000 horsepower diesel-electric engines and is capable of breaking ice as thick as two metres. 

Recently refurbished, Kapitan Khlebnikov comfortably accommodates up to 110 guests in well-appointed and spacious cabins and suites all featuring large windows that can be opened and en suite facilities. Common areas include large open decks, two dining rooms, a digitally equipped theatre-style lecture room, heated indoor pool, sauna, gymnasium, fully-stocked library, bar, lounge and four-person elevator.

This ship is, of course, not a ‘cruise ship’ in the traditional manner (she functions as a working icebreaker for much of the year) and will appeal most to those for whom exploring wild places and enjoying wild nature, rather than enjoying luxurious surroundings and ‘black-tie’ dinners with the officers, is the prime attraction.

Food is plentiful, of good quality, waiter-served and prepared by European, New Zealand or Australian chefs. The ship carries a small complement of expedition staff, including a naturalist, who give informal talks on the environment, wildlife and history of the region, where required, and also guide shore excursions.

As much of the sailing as possible is done at night (or what passes for night at these latitudes at this time of year!), thus maximizing opportunities for going ashore and enjoying the wildlife and beautiful landscapes to the full. Landings are carried out by means of a fleet of zodiacs and naiads, rugged, fast-moving inflatables designed for expedition work, which allow safe landings on remote coastlines in all types of conditions. The sheer speed and efficiency with which the crew carry out these landings, coupled with the small complement of passengers, allows everyone plenty of time ashore at most locations. Further information about the cruise, including photographs and details of the ship layout, including cabin layouts, are available on the Heritage Expeditions website (www.heritage-expeditions.com).

The great advantage of taking this particular cruise, if you are especially interested in seeing the fantastic wildlife of the region, is that the itinerary and day to day schedule are strongly wildlife-orientated. The expert expedition team will take you on guided walks and zodiac cruises, and provide lectures to help you better understand and appreciate this unique High Arctic landscape.

Birdquest pioneered expedition cruises to this area as far back as 1991.

Cross-Wrangel Option: For a few people there will be the option to travel across Wrangel by tundra vehicle, spending two nights ashore, either northbound or southbound. The crossing is organized by the Wrangel Nature Reserve staff and one night will be spent at the research base at Doubtful and another in a research hut in the wild interior. Those taking the northbound crossing will be dropped off at Doubtful and then picked up by the ship somewhere in the north and exchanged for those travelling south. The southbound expeditioners will be picked up at Doubtful before the ship sails back to Chukotka. There is an additional charge for the cross-Wrangel expedition and details can be obtained on request.

Accommodation & Transport: For details of the ship, see the introductory section.

Walking: The walking effort is mostly easy, but there are a few optional moderate hikes on offer at certain landings (an easy walking option is always available on such occasions).

Climate: Conditions will range from cool or even fairly warm to distinctly cold. Dry and sunny periods will be interspersed with overcast weather. Sea fog is quite possible at this season and there may be some rain or even snow.

Bird/Sea Mammal Photography: Opportunities are very good.

Important: Owing to the possibility, however small, of a severe airline delay, we would recommend that all participants not flying in from Nome (Alaska) on the charter flight for this cruise have at least one night in Anadyr prior to the cruise. Kindly note that in the event you decide not travel on the Nome-Anadyr charter and do not arrive in Anadyr in time to embark, the ship will not wait and neither the cruise operator nor ourselves can make a refund in such circumstances. Arriving early also has the advantage that your luggage could still catch up with you, should it go astray. We can make hotel bookings for you in Anadyr on request.

Important: Please bear in mind that circumstances may be encountered during the voyage which will make it necessary or desirable to deviate from the planned itinerary. These circumstances include poor weather conditions and unexpected opportunities for making additional zodiac excursions. The ship’s expedition leader will keep you fully informed throughout.

WRANGEL ISLAND & THE BERING STRAIT WILDLIFE TOUR: PRICE INFORMATION

For Anadyr/Anadyr cruise-only arrangements:

£8140, $11000, €9320 in a Superior Plus Triple Cabin with private bathroom

£11110, $15000, €12710 in a Superior Plus Cabin with private bathroom

£13700, $18500, €15670 in a Mini Suite with private bathroom

£16660, $22500, €19060 in an Heritage Suite with private bathroom.

Additional charge for optional overland traverse of Wrangel Island: £1070, $1450, €1220. Please inform us at booking if you want to do this.

Includes surface transportation, accommodations, meals, some soft drinks and entrance fees.

Gratuities for the expedition staff and crew, and a charge of $500 (payable in cash on board) to cover the landing fees levied by the local governments, are not included in the tour price. Gratuities are entirely at your discretion. The staff work very long hours to make such cruises a success, including a great deal of night sailing, and we have been told that most passengers give gratuities of around US$200-300 for such a cruise.

Single Cabin Supplement: Single occupancy of most cabins can be obtained in return for an 80% supplement on top of the cruise-only price (but suites require a 100% supplement). Please note that if you are willing to share but no cabin-mate is available you will not have to pay the single occupancy supplement.

Deposit: 25% (including any single supplement).

This tour is priced in US Dollars. Amounts shown in other currencies are indicative.

Kindly note that the balance due will be invoiced around 5 months before departure for payment not later than 120 days before departure.

Cancellation Charges: For cancellations made 180 days or more before departure, the cancellation charge is US$850 per person or equivalent. For cancellations made 91-179 days before departure, the cancellation charge is 100% of the deposit paid. For cancellations made 1-90 days before departure, or on the day of departure or later, the cancellation charge is 100% of the tour price.

Air Travel To & From The Tour: Our in-house IATA ticket agency will be pleased to arrange your air travel on request, or you may arrange this yourself if you prefer.

A shaft of sunshine amidst an early autumn snowstorm at Wrangel illuminates two Polar Bears feeding on a stranded Grey Whale; food that will keep them going until the sea ice forms once more. (Mark Beaman)

A shaft of sunshine amidst an early autumn snowstorm at Wrangel illuminates two Polar Bears feeding on a stranded Grey Whale; food that will keep them going until the sea ice forms once more. (Mark Beaman)

The prehistoric-looking Musk Ox is a Pleistocene survivor that thrives on Wrangel. This bull was so curious he followed us for 20 minutes. (Mark Beaman)

The prehistoric-looking Musk Ox is a Pleistocene survivor that thrives on Wrangel. This bull was so curious he followed us for 20 minutes. (Mark Beaman)

Is there any other polar critter with as much 'joie de vivre' as the Arctic Fox? (Mark Beaman)

Is there any other polar critter with as much 'joie de vivre' as the Arctic Fox? (Mark Beaman)

Thousands of Walruses haul out on the beaches of Kolyuchin and Wrangel Islands. (Mark Beaman)

Thousands of Walruses haul out on the beaches of Kolyuchin and Wrangel Islands. (Mark Beaman)

Horned Puffins may look sweet, but... (Mark Beaman)

Horned Puffins may look sweet, but... (Mark Beaman)

The wild tundra landscape of Wrangel is a draw in itself. (Mark Beaman)

The wild tundra landscape of Wrangel is a draw in itself. (Mark Beaman)

Unusual and spectacular lenticular clouds tower high over Wrangel. (Mark Beaman)

Unusual and spectacular lenticular clouds tower high over Wrangel. (Mark Beaman)

Polar Bears are one of the glories of Wrangel. We saw no fewer than 63 during our recent visit. (Mark Beaman)

Polar Bears are one of the glories of Wrangel. We saw no fewer than 63 during our recent visit. (Mark Beaman)

Polar Bears are concentrated along the shoreline of Wrangel Island, where the chances of food are highest. (Mark Beaman)

Polar Bears are concentrated along the shoreline of Wrangel Island, where the chances of food are highest. (Mark Beaman)

They seem to share food with reasonably good grace. (Mark Beaman)

They seem to share food with reasonably good grace. (Mark Beaman)

A cheeky young Glaucous Gull darts in for a snack of whale sinews... (Mark Beaman)

A cheeky young Glaucous Gull darts in for a snack of whale sinews... (Mark Beaman)

"Some crunchy Glaucous Gull will make a nice change from rotting whale..." (Mark Beaman)

"Some crunchy Glaucous Gull will make a nice change from rotting whale..." (Mark Beaman)

A Musk Ox at home amidst the wonderful colours of the Wrangel tundra. (Mark Beaman)

A Musk Ox at home amidst the wonderful colours of the Wrangel tundra. (Mark Beaman)

"Get ready to defend the herd boys, these bipeds could be dangerous..." (Mark Beaman)

"Get ready to defend the herd boys, these bipeds could be dangerous..." (Mark Beaman)

Arctic Foxes are everwhere on Wrangel. (Mark Beaman)

Arctic Foxes are everwhere on Wrangel. (Mark Beaman)

...and very cute... (Mark Beaman)

...and very cute... (Mark Beaman)

"You can't see me! Or can you?" (Mark Beaman)

"You can't see me! Or can you?" (Mark Beaman)

Inquisitive Walruses swim over to check out the zodiacs as we visit a Walrus haul-out. (Mark Beaman)

Inquisitive Walruses swim over to check out the zodiacs as we visit a Walrus haul-out. (Mark Beaman)

Two adults guard a baby Walrus, one carrying the youngster on its back. Polar Bears are an ever-present threat in their world. (Mark Beaman)

Two adults guard a baby Walrus, one carrying the youngster on its back. Polar Bears are an ever-present threat in their world. (Mark Beaman)

There must be more Snowy Owls on Wrangel than anywhere else of equivalent area in the Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

There must be more Snowy Owls on Wrangel than anywhere else of equivalent area in the Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

Herald Island, to the east of Wrangel, is just one of several seabird colonies visited. (Mark Beaman)

Herald Island, to the east of Wrangel, is just one of several seabird colonies visited. (Mark Beaman)

Horned Puffin is one of the most numerous breeding seabirds. (Mark Beaman)

Horned Puffin is one of the most numerous breeding seabirds. (Mark Beaman)

They look so sweet when they are 'loving' to each other... (Mark Beaman)

They look so sweet when they are 'loving' to each other... (Mark Beaman)

Tufted Puffins are less common, but even more spectacular. (Mark Beaman)

Tufted Puffins are less common, but even more spectacular. (Mark Beaman)

Tufted Puffins have the raucous, braying calls so typical of seabirds. (Mark Beaman)

Tufted Puffins have the raucous, braying calls so typical of seabirds. (Mark Beaman)

Brünnich's Guillemot or Thick-billed Murre is the most abundant breeding species here. (Mark Beaman)

Brünnich's Guillemot or Thick-billed Murre is the most abundant breeding species here. (Mark Beaman)

Common Guillemots become less numerous as one travels northwards. (Mark Beaman)

Common Guillemots become less numerous as one travels northwards. (Mark Beaman)

A Pigeon Guillemot calls to its mate, revealing the vermilion inside to its mouth, matching its legs. (Mark Beaman)

A Pigeon Guillemot calls to its mate, revealing the vermilion inside to its mouth, matching its legs. (Mark Beaman)

Black Guillemots reveal their dazzling white underwings as they launch themselves from the boulder piles. (Mark Beaman)

Black Guillemots reveal their dazzling white underwings as they launch themselves from the boulder piles. (Mark Beaman)

The Parakeet Auklet is one of the smaller alcids of the region. (Mark Beaman)

The Parakeet Auklet is one of the smaller alcids of the region. (Mark Beaman)

The Least Auklet lives up to its name, being barely more than sparrow-sized. (Mark Beaman)

The Least Auklet lives up to its name, being barely more than sparrow-sized. (Mark Beaman)

They whirr over the water on tiny wings that look far too small. (Mark Beaman)

They whirr over the water on tiny wings that look far too small. (Mark Beaman)

A Glaucous Gull takes to the air. (Mark Beaman)

A Glaucous Gull takes to the air. (Mark Beaman)

Humpback Whales seem to be everywhere in the waters around Chukotka. (Mark Beaman)

Humpback Whales seem to be everywhere in the waters around Chukotka. (Mark Beaman)

They were busily sounding as they fed in the shallow waters. (Mark Beaman)

They were busily sounding as they fed in the shallow waters. (Mark Beaman)

A Northern Fulmar passes right by a sounding Humpback. (Mark Beaman)

A Northern Fulmar passes right by a sounding Humpback. (Mark Beaman)

No Arctic sunset is complete without those flukes... (Mark Beaman)

No Arctic sunset is complete without those flukes... (Mark Beaman)

Millions of Short-tailed Shearwaters from Australia and New Zealand migrate north to the Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean to harvest the rich summer bonanza. (Mark Beaman)

Millions of Short-tailed Shearwaters from Australia and New Zealand migrate north to the Bering Sea and the Arctic Ocean to harvest the rich summer bonanza. (Mark Beaman)

A Short-tailed Shearwater, heavily burdened with fat before its migration south to the Antipodes, struggles to take wing. (Mark Beaman)

A Short-tailed Shearwater, heavily burdened with fat before its migration south to the Antipodes, struggles to take wing. (Mark Beaman)

Sometimes the shearwaters glide over a glassy sea. (Mark Beaman)

Sometimes the shearwaters glide over a glassy sea. (Mark Beaman)

As Short-tailed Albatrosses slowly recover in numbers, so they are being sighted further and further north. This young bird was encountered just south of the Bering Strait! (Mark Beaman)

As Short-tailed Albatrosses slowly recover in numbers, so they are being sighted further and further north. This young bird was encountered just south of the Bering Strait! (Mark Beaman)

The Sandhill Cranes of Northeastern Siberia migrate across the Bering Strait to winter in western North America. (Mark Beaman)

The Sandhill Cranes of Northeastern Siberia migrate across the Bering Strait to winter in western North America. (Mark Beaman)

At this season the Red Phalaropes are moulting into their 'Grey Phalarope' winter garb. (Mark Beaman)

At this season the Red Phalaropes are moulting into their 'Grey Phalarope' winter garb. (Mark Beaman)

A flock of Red Phalaropes heads south to warmer climes. (Mark Beaman)

A flock of Red Phalaropes heads south to warmer climes. (Mark Beaman)

Pomarine Jaegers are everywhere in the high Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

Pomarine Jaegers are everywhere in the high Arctic. (Mark Beaman)

Pacific Loons are common in the high Arctic tundra of NE Asia and NW North America. (Mark Beaman)

Pacific Loons are common in the high Arctic tundra of NE Asia and NW North America. (Mark Beaman)

Yellow-billed Loon is another tundra specialist in summer. (Mark Beaman)

Yellow-billed Loon is another tundra specialist in summer. (Mark Beaman)

A large wooden Russian Orthodox church looks out across the harbour. (Mark Beaman)

A large wooden Russian Orthodox church looks out across the harbour. (Mark Beaman)

Largha Seals enjoy the summer feast when the salmon run at Anadyr. (Mark Beaman)

Largha Seals enjoy the summer feast when the salmon run at Anadyr. (Mark Beaman)

Every so often there is a frenzy in the water as a seal catches a salmon. (Mark Beaman)

Every so often there is a frenzy in the water as a seal catches a salmon. (Mark Beaman)

Beluga Whales also join in the hunt, coming within 10 metres of the shoreline. (Mark Beaman)

Beluga Whales also join in the hunt, coming within 10 metres of the shoreline. (Mark Beaman)

Vega Gulls pick over the left-overs from the feast. (Mark Beaman)

Vega Gulls pick over the left-overs from the feast. (Mark Beaman)

At Whalebone Alley on Yttygran Island an avenue of whale ribs was erected by native peoples in the distant past. Anthropologists still debate its purpose.

At Whalebone Alley on Yttygran Island an avenue of whale ribs was erected by native peoples in the distant past. Anthropologists still debate its purpose.

Sailing conditions in this part of the world are often delightfully calm. The sound between Yttygran and Arakamchechen Islands. (Mark Beaman)

Sailing conditions in this part of the world are often delightfully calm. The sound between Yttygran and Arakamchechen Islands. (Mark Beaman)

Beautiful wildflowers are a feature of the short Arctic summer. (Mark Beaman)

Beautiful wildflowers are a feature of the short Arctic summer. (Mark Beaman)

From August onwards the tundra leaves turn shades of red and gold. (Mark Beaman)

From August onwards the tundra leaves turn shades of red and gold. (Mark Beaman)

Arctic Ground Squirrels feast while the bounty lasts. (Mark Beaman)

Arctic Ground Squirrels feast while the bounty lasts. (Mark Beaman)

At Cape Dezhnev at the narrowest point of the Bering Strait there is a monument to Semen Dezhnev, whose party of explorers were the first Europeans to reach the area in 1648. Dezhnev, not Bering, discovered the strait! (Mark Beaman)

At Cape Dezhnev at the narrowest point of the Bering Strait there is a monument to Semen Dezhnev, whose party of explorers were the first Europeans to reach the area in 1648. Dezhnev, not Bering, discovered the strait! (Mark Beaman)

The little settlement at Doubtful on the south coast of Wrangel hosts the headquarters of the Wrangel Island Nature Reserve. (Mark Beaman)

The little settlement at Doubtful on the south coast of Wrangel hosts the headquarters of the Wrangel Island Nature Reserve. (Mark Beaman)

At the Diomede Islands in the Bering Strait, Russian Big Diomede on the right is in 'today' while American Little Diomede on the left is still in 'yesterday'. A totally unique and very strange juxtaposition! (Mark Beaman)

At the Diomede Islands in the Bering Strait, Russian Big Diomede on the right is in 'today' while American Little Diomede on the left is still in 'yesterday'. A totally unique and very strange juxtaposition! (Mark Beaman)

An Arctic sunset at the Bering Strait. (Mark Beaman)

An Arctic sunset at the Bering Strait. (Mark Beaman)

Many of the flight-inclusive holidays on this website are financially protected by the ATOL scheme. But ATOL protection does not apply to all holiday and travel services listed on this website. Please ask us to confirm what protection may apply to your booking. If you do not receive an ATOL Certificate then the booking will not be ATOL protected. If you do receive an ATOL Certificate but all the parts of your trip are not listed on it, those parts will not be ATOL protected. Please see our booking conditions for information, or for more for more information about financial protection and the ATOL Certificate go to: www.atol.org.uk/ATOL Certificate

Birdquest Ltd is Registered in England, Company No. 01568270. The address of our registered office is Two Jays, Kemple End, Stonyhurst, Clitheroe, Lancashire BB7 9QY

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