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BRAZIL'S EASTERN AMAZONIA

Tuesday 6th September - Saturday 24th September 2016

Eduardo Patrial

The stunning Kaempfer's Woodpecker (Eduardo Patrial)

The stunning Kaempfer's Woodpecker (Eduardo Patrial)

No fewer than five hundred (513) species were recorded on the first and so expected Brazil’s Eastern Amazonia. The destinations in Pará and Maranhão states proved to gather numerous great birds, including several rarities and some of the most difficult Brazilian endemic species to see in the wild. The tour was also an interesting experience, where we had the chance to contemplate pristine habitats by the mighty Tapajos River, on the peculiar hills of Carajas National Forest and finally in the vast Cerrado and transitional woodland from Caxias. And therefore understand a little better the avifauna from two important interfluvium in the Brazilian Amazon (Madeira – Tapajos and Xingu – Tocantins), and from the less covered corner in the Northeast region at Maranhão state. It is true it wasn’t the easiest trip. To reach this fantastic result in terms of birds we had to deal with a quite tough logistics, covering long distances by air, water and land. A relentless weather (very hot and humid at Amazonia National Park and very hot and dry in Caxias) and long drives every day in Carajas National Forest put some extra conditions. But undoubtedly all the effort was worth it, check it out the highlights from this birding adventure: Chestnut-headed and Buff-browed Chachalacas, White-crested Guan, Bare-faced Curassow, Capped Heron, King Vulture, Pearl Kite, Harpy Eagle, Black, Black-and-white and Ornate Hawk-Eagles, White Hawk, Rufous-sided Crake, Dark-winged Trumpeter (both subspecies viridis and dextralis), Large-billed Tern, Hoatzin, Red-legged Seriema, Black-bellied Cuckoo, Tawny-bellied Screech Owl (a distinct related form to usta found in Carajas which is being studied – Dantas et al. in prep.), Amazonian Pygmy Owl, Least Nighthawk, the rare Silky-tailed Nightjar, Cinnamon-throated Hermit (form known as Maranhao Hermit), the uncommon Fiery-tailed Awlbill, Rufous-throated Sapphire, Amazonian Trogon, Amazonian and Broad-billed Motmots, Blue-necked, Green-tailed, Paradise and Great Jacamars, White-necked, Pied, Spotted, Collared, Eastern Striolated, Crescent-chested and Rufous-necked Puffbirds, Rusty-breasted and Rufous-capped Nunlets, the localized Brown-chested Barbet, Lettered, Red-necked and Black-necked Aracaris, Gould’s Toucanet, Bar-breasted and Spotted Piculets, White-throated, Yellow-throated, Golden-green, Waved, Chestnut, Ochre-backed, Cream-colored, Red-necked and Crimson-crested Woodpeckers, the mighty bird of the tour Kaempfer’s Woodpecker, Black and Red-throated Caracaras, amazing looks at Cryptic Forest Falcon, White-winged and Golden-winged Parakeets, the endemic Vulturine Parrot, Yellow-crowned, Turquoise-fronted and Southern Mealy Amazons, Dusky-billed Parrotlet, Red-fan Parrot, Crimson-bellied, Santarem, Peach-fronted and Jandaya Parakeets, Hyacinth, Red-bellied, Blue-winged, Scarlet, Red-and-green and Chestnut-fronted Macaws, the uncommon endemic Golden Parakeet, Ruddy, Chestnut-throated and Speckled Spinetails, Chestnut-winged Hookbill, the uncommon Cinnamon-rumped and Chestnut-crowned Foliage-gleaners, the endemic Para Foliage-gleaner, Slender-billed Xenops, White-chinned, Long-billed, Cinnamon-throated, endemic Brigida’s, Strong-billed, rare endemic Moustached, Amazonian Barred (both subspecies concolor and retentus), endemic Hoffmann’s, Black-banded, Planalto, Elegant, endemic Spix’s, Buff-throated, Narrow-billed, Rondonia and endemic Layard’s Woodcreepers, endemic Glossy, Natterer’s Slaty, Planalto Slaty, Amazonian, Saturnine and Spot-winged Antshrikes, White-eyed, Ornate, Plain-throated, Amazonian Streaked, Sclater’s, Long-winged, Ihering’s and Grey Antwrens, the uncommon Banded Antbird, Black-capped, rare endemic Pectoral, Rufous-winged, Dot-winged and Southern White-fringed Antwrens, Blackish and Manu Antbirds, White-backed Fire-eye, endemics Spix’s Warbling and Rufous-faced Antbirds, the stunning Ferruginous-backed Antbird, the rare and odd Wing-banded Antbird, the mega localized Harlequin Antbird, Dot-backed and Xingu Scale-backed Antbirds, Black-spotted Bare-eye, Rufous-capped Antthrush, Snethlage’s and Alta Floresta Antpittas, the cracking Chestnut-belted, endemic Black-bellied and Hooded Gnateaters, Wing-barred Piprites, Southern Scrub Flycatcher, Snethlage’s Tody-Tyrant, the new species ‘Maranhao-Piauí’ Pygmy Tyrant, the rare Black-and-white Tody-Flycatcher and Black-chested Tyrant, Zimmer’s Flatbill (the sucunduri subspecies, proposed as new species), Golden-crowned Spadebill, Blackish Pewee, Dusky-chested and Three-striped Flycatchers, Rufous and endemic Ash-throated Casiornis, Purple-breasted, Spangled and endemic White-tailed Cotingas, White Bellbird, Purple-throated Fruitcrow, Pale-bellied Tyrant-Manakin, Fiery-capped, Snow-capped, endemic Opal-crowned, Flame-crested and Red-headed Manakins, the Amazonian (Carajas) version of Sharpbill, Amazonian Royal Flycatcher, Cinereous Mourner, White-browed Purpletuft, Pink-throated Becard, Slaty-capped Shrike-Vireo, Grey-chested and Buff-cheeked Greenlets, endemic White-napped Jay, White-banded and Black-collared Swallows, Coraya Wren, White-lored, White-vented and Rufous-bellied Euphonias, Olive Oropendola, Oriole Blackbird, Red-cowled Cardinal, Black-faced, Red-billed Pied, Fulvous-crested, White-winged Shrike, Turquoise, Spotted, Bay-headed and Masked Tanagers, Coal-crested Finch, Grey Pileated Finch, Wing-barred Seedeater, Rose-breasted Chat, Yellow-green and Yellow-shouldered Grosbeaks and the uncommon Blackish-blue Seedeater.

The amazing Harlequin Antbird (Eduardo Patrial)

The amazing Harlequin Antbird (Eduardo Patrial)